Who Are You and What Do You Do?

Two simple questions that can illuminate how we see ourselves and our place in the world

“I am a mother of four and an Associate Dean at the University at Buffalo”

“I am a University leader who works to develop and leverage potential toward the greater good”

“I am a connector, facilitator, and creator of new community models and paradigms”

We all have access to an infinite number of descriptors and frames for characterizing who we are and what we do. The way we define or describe ourselves and our life work can vary with our mood, audience, or area of focus. But by putting ourselves out there in a way that is thoughtful and authentic, we can define our space in and for the world and invite others to engage, share, and co-create.

This morning when I was driving my daughters to school I asked them who they are and what they do. Claire quickly announced that she is a gymnast. And Natalie exclaimed that she is a lover of nature and animals. Obviously their depictions are incomplete, yet they serve as bold announcements of their core interests and passions which are still so beautifully clear and accessible.

As we grow older we often lose the brilliance of our passions, strengths, and gifts. We learn to become more understated in our introductions, qualifying the expectations of ourselves and others. We wear our titles and job descriptions like a yoke, yearning to unburden ourselves yet complicit in our own subjugation.

What is our fear of brilliance? Is it the association with bragging, boastfulness, or conceit?

How interesting that narcissism is on the rise with an insatiable thirst for material possessions and status. People yearn to be beautiful, successful, and powerful yet we cannot exclaim the importance of our mission or the passion with which we work and live.

Several years ago my oldest daughter told me that I am not like other mothers in that I love myself so much.

I could tell that her words were not intended to sting or embarrass, but that she was testing out an observation and trying to put her finger on a quality that she was drawn to but also a little afraid. I explained that I do love myself but even more importantly that I love my life. Every day I have opportunities to make a difference, to connect with people, and to learn.

She assured me that this wasn’t a bad thing…. just different.

Sometimes I have the urge to introduce others to the world and to point out the amazing things that make them so unique and important. In doing so, it is my hope that they will begin to see themselves as I do, and to appreciate the gifts that they have and the power that they possess to make a difference.

So try this… pretend that you are me describing you, and ask yourself…

Who am I, and what do I do?

What Will You Offer, What Will You Seek? Finding your place in the new Community Commerce paradigm

Forget about money, just for a second, I promise we’ll come back to it later.  For now it’s all about what you can offer.  Anything of value is fair game.  And by value I mean anything that is perceived to be of use- certainly any skills associated with your work or profession, but don’t stop there.  You can offer any hobbies, talents, or resources that could be wanted or needed by those in your community.

People are ready, they are waiting for what you have to offer.  They search the website often, browsing through postings of resources and services, carefully reading bios and community reviews.  As with other posted services, costs for yours will be nominal, but note that they won’t go directly to you.  Instead, they will be paid to the community organization of your choosing, either in the form of a donation or service.  So cost will be no obstacle, your services will be accessible to all who can benefit.

Why will you participate?  Perhaps you are craving a community connection and seeking an avenue through which to serve and contribute.  But chances are that even if you see the humanitarian value, you are looking to leverage your services toward paid opportunities.  By occasionally posting on the site and foregoing any direct fees or payments, you know that the advertising potential is vast.  Since you can self-promote and provide links to professional sites and materials, each in-kind offering could yield significant future sales.  And since you can try out new offerings and ideas, you can use the portal as a low-risk incubator, helping to develop your offerings and brand.

It gets better. As a contributor you will earn community credits to be used both on the site and towards local services and educational opportunities.  Credits are determined based on the yield of your own offerings, so the more you earn for your designated community organizations, the more you can spend on your own growth and development.  Or if you prefer, you can designate your credits toward growth opportunities for others which in turn will earn you special designation on the site.

Clearly, it’s all about community development.  But because the costs for all featured services are kept low and information about providers and recipients transparent, the site attracts a large and diverse audience, and becomes a magnet for advertisers.  To be featured however, sponsors must highlight their own community service credentials, with their support dollars used to fund mentoring and seed grant programs, which further build out the site and surrounding community.

With virtually no overhead or infrastructure costs, the Community Commerce portal represents an exciting model for community and economic development.  It can be replicated in virtually any community across the world. And perhaps the most amazing feature of the model is that it is built entirely on the answers to two simple questions….

What will you offer, and what will you seek?