The promise of students, multidisciplinarity, and stories yet to be told

Tz students

Today students are officially notified of their acceptance into our Tanzania winter session study abroad course. While this year’s applicant pool is impressive on many levels, it is the diversity of academic majors and programs of study that is particularly noteworthy. Among this year’s class are aspiring social workers, engineers, historians, doctors, nurses, psychologists, and biomedical researchers- all committed to traveling to rural Northeastern Tanzania to explore community development in context.

This multidisciplinary response to our offering is literally music to my soul. It speaks to the compassion of students but also to the promise of engaging their collective talents around the complexities of community development. The importance of their engagement should be both obvious and compelling. For it is only through the design and leadership of innovative and bold new models and paradigms that we can address the inequities and empower our communities to thrive.

What I love so much about working at a research university is the endless opportunities to learn and discover, connecting ideas and theories toward deeper understanding and insight. By extending this multidisciplinary exploration to students from diverse disciplines and fields of study within a remote and fascinatingly complex part of the world, we have the opportunity to set them on a path of discovery and impact.

Clearly, there are many compelling stories yet to be told as we anticipate our January trip and get to know the students who will be participating. When I reflect on the insights and accomplishments of past participants, I can’t help but be inspired and hopeful about the future, the promise of global learning, and the fascinating connections that await.

We look forward to sharing student stories in the months ahead and invite you to visit and follow our new blog site, buffalotanzania.wordpress.com for information and updates from our study abroad trip, upcoming book, and BTEP (Buffalo Tanzania Education Program) model.

-Mara

Success with a Purpose: (Re)defining the next phase of our work

purpose

We have a lot riding on success.

In addition to improving the lives of individuals and their families, and fostering broader economic health, we see financial success as the primary vehicle for addressing systemic inequities. By helping disenfranchised groups gain access to opportunities and resources, we seek to elevate their standard of living while creating more space for prosperity and growth.

The Women’s Movement has been the most successful large-scale effort to move a defined population into the opportunity continuum. Since women have gained access to virtually every level of the workforce, to some degree, many are now focusing on enhancing positions of authority, leadership, and influence, in hopes of elevating conditions while contributing to the broader systems-level and societal change that we so urgently need. When framed within the deepening challenges facing women and children around the world, and the recent stagnation of women’s progress with regard to key success metrics, it’s not surprising that some women are espousing a specific form of feminism that urges us to dig (or lean) in and fight for our places within the vast power hierarchy.

More than ever, we are invited through books, workshops, coaches and conferences to develop the necessary skills, networks, and dispositions to fight the fight and stay the course. Personally, I have found Women’s Leadership messages and programs to be both inspiring and well intentioned, but ultimately no match for the complexity of the work that stands before us. Through navigating my own circuitous career, observing the self-destruction of many talented and competent women around me, and offering my assistance wherever possible, I have come to the realization that we are desperately in need of more powerful tools and supports than are currently offered.

If we are open, three daunting truths can frame and provide guidance for the next stage of our efforts. First, the complex nature of the professional, economic and political landscape and the subtle and nuanced ways that women are blocked from the full equity we seek, call for more sophisticated tools, strategies, and metrics for navigating and moving. Second, many of our existing systems, leaders, and jobs are fundamentally limited and do not afford the opportunities for connections, creativity, and growth that are most conducive to women’s impact. This reality necessitates the creation of new opportunities beyond what already exist. And third, the existing infrastructure fails to map individual success and talent to societal or systems-level gains, so the success of women (individually or collectively) will not result in, by design, the broader impacts that we need.

This final point alone should warrant immediate attention. Once we acknowledge that our current approaches to success- even if fully realized- would not bring about the scope and depth of change that frames our very Movement, then we need to revisit our notion of success and determine where it falls short. Clearly, we needn’t search far. Virtually all aspects of success, down to our working definition, are based on notions of competing for limited opportunities and access within an inherently competitive playing field. Accordingly, our support and intervention models unpack this definition through the cultivation of strategy, networks, and motivation all with the goal of getting more women in and through the hierarchy, and ultimately to the top.

In addition to being exhausting, this model of fighting and competing is insensitive to many of the more subtle nuances and complexities that obstruct women from positions of influence and the ability to make change. If we want women to not only gain a better life for themselves and their families but also to contribute to stronger communities and a better world, we need to arm them with more sophisticated frameworks, models, knowledge, and tools that will allow them to gain access but also to effectively stretch and reshape the spaces in which they work and live, creating more room for themselves and others to move, grow, and more fully contribute.

To be clear, I am not suggesting that we stop fighting for equitable compensation or opportunities. On the contrary, I am suggesting that we begin to fight and work for much more. This next phase of our evolution calls for more noble and ambitious goals that extend well beyond ourselves. If powerful and clear enough, these goals can serve as a shared vision, propelling us further while connecting us with one another along the way. We will need new paradigms for support and development, a deeper understanding of the complex contexts affecting ourselves and the world, and a comfort with process frameworks be they innovation, community development, or problem solving. We will need to provide our children and ourselves with new narratives and characters in literature and all the various media platforms, expanding the ideals to which we aspire and reference our own worth and progress.

Clearly there is a great deal of work to be done. But our investments will yield far reaching benefits well beyond what we can even know.

-Mara Huber

 

Be Brilliant

It begins with a spark, a current of energy that radiates outward, illuminating the darkness and igniting our collective possibilities.

It exists among us in people of all ages and backgrounds. Although some have achieved prominence it is not about money or power in the traditional sense.

Brilliance is an inner light that shines with clarity and purpose, emanating from within while radiating outward, catching and amplifying the light of others, brightening our world.

To behold it, we must be open and ready. For brilliance is most often quiet and understated.

A taxi driver from Ethiopia who sends his children home every summer to remember what’s important; a homeless woman who feels blessed to sleep in a park that is peaceful and safe, asking of nothing and appreciating the gift of life

Sometimes brilliance is bold and dramatic. A friend who funds medical projects in Africa, or Rotary clubs that together eradicate polio around the world

But regardless of the scope or focus, brilliance includes a heightened sense of purpose and meaning that serve as a driver, activating courage and strength, and mitigating fear.

People who shine brilliantly possess an inherent respect for others, and an ability to experience joy and gratitude that nourish their soul and provide all that they need.

To be clear, the world does not cultivate brilliance, nor does it recognize it as such. In fact the very word is defined as a one-dimensional strength, impressive and rare, but somehow different, as if too much.

Perhaps the notion of brilliance is inherently scary. If we were to acknowledge that it exists and represents a superior state that cannot be bought by money, power, or influence, it would be too jarring to address.

In many ways we are unprepared for brilliance, finding it easier to modulate our light, keeping our expectations low and seeking satisfaction in good enough.

After all, those who dare to shine often find their light weakened or snuffed out by others who fail to nurture their flames.

It is ironic that brilliance is viewed as threatening when it has the power to elevate us all.

By merely recognizing brilliance we connect with what is important and are rewarded with a sense of warmth and promise, a clarity that can guide us toward our own growth and fulfillment.

But how can we nurture brilliance, in ourselves and others?

First we must develop our sensitivity- noting shifts in our own levels of radiance and the radiance of others, as conditions change and become more or less conducive.

As we begin to notice changes we can glimpse the sources of our light, feeling out the edges and boundaries and appreciating our impacts and possibilities.

It is critical that we start with ourselves. For t is only when we are shining brightly and able to sustain our own brilliance that we can cultivate it in those around us.

Yes, brilliance is highly combustible, spreading from person to person, eventually  lighting up the world.

And although it begins with any one of us, we simply cannot be brilliant alone.

What Will You Offer, What Will You Seek? Finding your place in the new Community Commerce paradigm

Forget about money, just for a second, I promise we’ll come back to it later.  For now it’s all about what you can offer.  Anything of value is fair game.  And by value I mean anything that is perceived to be of use- certainly any skills associated with your work or profession, but don’t stop there.  You can offer any hobbies, talents, or resources that could be wanted or needed by those in your community.

People are ready, they are waiting for what you have to offer.  They search the website often, browsing through postings of resources and services, carefully reading bios and community reviews.  As with other posted services, costs for yours will be nominal, but note that they won’t go directly to you.  Instead, they will be paid to the community organization of your choosing, either in the form of a donation or service.  So cost will be no obstacle, your services will be accessible to all who can benefit.

Why will you participate?  Perhaps you are craving a community connection and seeking an avenue through which to serve and contribute.  But chances are that even if you see the humanitarian value, you are looking to leverage your services toward paid opportunities.  By occasionally posting on the site and foregoing any direct fees or payments, you know that the advertising potential is vast.  Since you can self-promote and provide links to professional sites and materials, each in-kind offering could yield significant future sales.  And since you can try out new offerings and ideas, you can use the portal as a low-risk incubator, helping to develop your offerings and brand.

It gets better. As a contributor you will earn community credits to be used both on the site and towards local services and educational opportunities.  Credits are determined based on the yield of your own offerings, so the more you earn for your designated community organizations, the more you can spend on your own growth and development.  Or if you prefer, you can designate your credits toward growth opportunities for others which in turn will earn you special designation on the site.

Clearly, it’s all about community development.  But because the costs for all featured services are kept low and information about providers and recipients transparent, the site attracts a large and diverse audience, and becomes a magnet for advertisers.  To be featured however, sponsors must highlight their own community service credentials, with their support dollars used to fund mentoring and seed grant programs, which further build out the site and surrounding community.

With virtually no overhead or infrastructure costs, the Community Commerce portal represents an exciting model for community and economic development.  It can be replicated in virtually any community across the world. And perhaps the most amazing feature of the model is that it is built entirely on the answers to two simple questions….

What will you offer, and what will you seek?