Archive | For Humanitarians RSS for this section

Nimbleness, Resetting and Getting Unstuck

In this video I share a process for resetting your community development work that can be used when you are feeling stuck or out of alignment. By using the modeling framework described in my previous video, I discuss 5 design elements that will allow you to identify changes or challenges and make the necessary adjustments to get your initiative back on track toward greater success and sustainability.

Why Modeling is More Powerful than Strategic Planning

Although traditional planning exercises can be useful, they’re inherently limited and flat, and of little use as we try to navigate the challenges and changes that swirl around our work, lives, and efforts to add value. In this video I make the case for “modeling” as a dynamic and powerful tool to support all stages of creating movement, building capacity and getting unstuck.

Be Brilliant Video Series: Introduction

Through this new video series I will share strategies and reflections for building capacity, getting unstuck, and creating movement toward more impactful results and relationships. These tools can be applied to organizational, programmatic or individual efforts and accompany the “Be Brilliant” eBook available through this site. Join my blog site (button on right) to receive new posts and videos directly. Please share feedback and requests for additional videos and exercises focusing on specific topics or areas of brilliance. I hope you find these useful- Mara

Refocusing Experiential Learning for Greater Equity and Impact

128129

photo by Doug Levere

Well-designed experiential learning offerings support deep and transformative outcomes. While this is true, it is potentially misleading- suggesting that the primary (or only) flow of learning moves from the experience- designed and delivered by educators and institutions/organizations- to the student. In reality, the student plays a more powerful role, one that is certainly not passive or secondary in nature. Even the best-designed experiences require students to activate their potential, bringing a sense of openness, curiosity and knowledge along with other skills and dispositions that affect short and long-term impacts. While the best programs and implementers work to foster these critical student attributes, they often rely on the selection of students to ensure ideal fit and the ultimate success and sustainability of programs.

However, if we were to shift our focus from program design and implementation to preparing students to embrace and leverage experiences in their most diverse and varied forms, we would reach a startling realization. If students were truly empowered with the mindsets, tools, and processes to transform (their) experiences into the greatest impacts, then power would shift away from the institutions and structures that have traditionally controlled the opportunity landscape. It is not that schools or teachers would become unnecessary or unimportant, but instead, that their influence would be tied to their ability to support and integrate student experiences (both in and out of school) with academic learning and development.

This shift in power- from institution to individual students and groups of students- would be even more profound if we were to sharpen our focus on the types of experiences deemed valuable. If we take our lead from the Global Challenges, 21st Century Learning/ Professional Skills, and other efforts to identify critical areas for growth, leadership and innovation, we would begin to prioritize those most closely aligned. And if we were to acknowledge the value of Design Thinking and Innovation, we would observe that those who are the closest to the most pressing problems are the best positioned to lead their respective solutions. Accordingly, we would begin to value authenticity of experiences and prioritize the students who are most compelled and inspired with the necessary credibility and “social capital” to dig in. If we were to empower students who met these new definitions of “readiness” to transform their experiences into innovation and problems solving, imagine what they could accomplish and how communities could benefit from their growth.

I want to make this point clear, because I think it is quite profound – not in terms of my own insight, but instead the associated implications. If experiential learning truly represents a gateway to deep student impacts and opportunities for academic and professional success, and we allow institutions of education to be the only way to access recognized experiences, then we are missing the point, and promise of this paradigm.

Experiences, by definition, are highly personal and contextualized. We do not own them, should not control them, but we can and must support them.

Some may find this assertion/realization troubling in that it challenges the status quo in ways that may (will/should) threaten our existing structures and systems. It is true that in order to remain relevant and viable, institutions of higher education and schools will strive to offer more high-impact learning experiences for students. And those who have access will hopefully continue to embrace them. However, once we acknowledge that this is not the only pathway, we must begin the work of clarifying and developing the tools and resources that will help students (wherever they are) transform their own experiences into high-impact practices. It is through this simultaneously top/middle-down and bottom-up approach that we can begin to realize the true potential of high-impact experiential learning and the exciting expansion and innovation that it will catalyze.

Behold the Birth of a new Collaboration

bike2

Tomorrow in Musoma, Tanzania (a rural area near the border of Kenya, along the shores of Lake Victoria), 16 girls will be receiving bicycles of their very own. The bikes will allow them to continue their schooling, providing a safe alternative to walking the many miles between the nearest school and their villages. For these orphans and vulnerable girls, bicycles will offer hope and a pathway toward growth and empowerment. The value of these gifts cannot be overstated.

So how did these beautiful, shiny new bikes find their way to Hope Revival Children’s Organization, ready to change the lives of girls who will receive them?  This story involves the virtual meeting of two of my favorite people- Stephen Marwa and my father, Rich Goodman.

Those of you who follow my work, and blog, already know Stephen. I have extolled his virtues through numerous posts and also in our eBook .  Since first connecting with Stephen via email in 2016, I have found him to be an outstanding partner, mentoring our students, leading collaborative initiatives, while expertly building his capacity (and the capacity of his team and organization) to steward positive community change. When our student, Danielle, became interested in a model for reusable sanitary pads, he jumped on the idea and quickly initiated the project, creating a new social enterprise that is gaining attention both within and outside of the country. From the very beginning, Stephen was ready to embrace new engagement ideas and collaborators.

Enter my father and his life-long love for bicycles. Most of my childhood memories feature my Dad engaging with bikes- fixing them, building them, or helping others learn to do so, either in his workroom, or through various community efforts, fundraisers, and collaborative initiatives. More than a hobby, he used bicycles as a vehicle for supporting learning, independence, health, and community responsibility. His organizations- first Wheel People and then Spoke Folk have done amazing things for Dunkirk, NY and the surrounding community, working with the disabled, vulnerable populations and most recently partnering with Meals on Wheels as featured in this video. Over the years I had hoped to connect my father’s social entrepreneurship projects with my evolving efforts in Tanzania, but finding the right partner has been a challenge. You see, my father’s ethical standards and expectations for collaboration are quite high, to say the least. He insists on doing things the right way, with a sense of integrity and commitment that can be daunting to some. But not to Stephen.

Upon connecting these two innovators, the impacts were catalytic. Stephen embraced the bike idea immediately, identifying a nearby bike store and getting a plan in place. The beneficiaries were identified, and he worked with his team to ensure sufficient capacity for maintaining the bikes and supporting the investment. Within three days of wiring the initial donation from THE SPOKE FOLK/WHEEL PEOPLE COMMUNITY BICYCLE PROJECT (now an independent community initiative), I received pictures of the purchased bicycles and news that they will be distributed tomorrow.

bikes

I cannot wait to see what comes of this initiative. It appears that Stephen and my father are already discussing future plans for a bike repair center and workshop. Clearly the programmatic possibilities are infinite. But beyond this, their collaboration makes me realize the importance of readiness. My father has been ready for a long time, waiting for the right opportunity and partner to activate his considerable talents and resources. And Stephen’s readiness has been building; a readiness to embrace opportunities that align with his community’s needs, building his amazing HRCO team and organization, and his relationships with area leaders and their communities. His capacity building has extended to his mastery of technology, grant writing and a reputation quickly built on integrity, transparency and follow-through.

What can happen when we connect people who are truly ready; when we incubate partnership spaces  that are built on trust, respect and a mutual commitment to growth and empowerment? I feel truly blessed to be engaged in this work and poised to behold and nurture its impacts.

img_1441

Experiential Learning Calls: Join UB in Tanzania this Summer

dancers

(photos by Doug Levere)

As we deepen our commitment to high-impact experiential learning and collaborative innovation, we recognize that everyone has something of value to contribute. We find that the closer we get to places, people and problems, the more we can leverage our talents, resources and connections. This is the promise of high-impact experiential learning that we look forward to actualizing in the coming year.

This July, as we travel to Tanzania to celebrate 10 years of engagement, friendship and discovery, I am excited to bring a select group of non-students to join our study abroad cohort, ready to contribute their talents, resources and ideas to help expand our reach and broaden our impacts.

What will you gain from the trip? In addition to experiencing the unparalleled beauty of Tanzania and the hospitality of its people, you will engage with our students, joining all aspects of the program and customizing your own goals and projects based on your unique background, areas of expertise and networks.

The course focuses broadly on women’s empowerment and social innovation, with many themes and topics to be explored, including but not limited to: girls’ education, water and sustainability, economic development, global health, social entrepreneurship, technology, STEM education, and leadership. Our partners include non-profits, higher education, faith-based, schools and other communities and organizations eager to expand our collaboration toward mutual goals and interests.

You can learn more about the trip and our broader Tanzania project by reading our eBook, “On Tanzania Time” available as an open-source free PDF  http://hdl.handle.net/10477/78315

If  you are interested in learning more, please email me at mbhuber@buffalo.edu  I would love to discuss your interests!

classroom2farm7wui3yurmx

Be Brilliant: Reflections and exercises for helping ourselves, and others, give and get more

 

Our new Tanzania Book: completely free and accessible from any computer or digital device

OnTanzaniaTime-LinkedIn-final (002)

Book PDF

I’m so excited to share our new book, “On Tanzania Time: Celebrating 10 Years of Friendship, Engagement and Discovery in the Mara Region”

This book is as personal as it gets. It shares the early stages of our partnership when I first met members of the Immaculate Heart Sisters of Africa who were studying in Buffalo, and led my first trip to the Mara Region of  Tanzania in 2009. But it also details the fascinating evolution of our engagement as we expanded our focus and eventually connected with diverse partners who share their stories and visions in their own words. Also featured are some of our outstanding UB students who have allowed their time in Tanzania to permeate their lives and career goals, and recollections and context from my dear friend and colleague Dan Nyaronga who happens to be from the very region, and town.

How do these stories, impacts and visions all connect? Please consider reading about our journey and allow yourself to imagine all that is possible when we come together toward ideas and goals that are larger than our own.

It is important to note that we are making this book available in a free PDF format which is accessible, downloadable, printable, and shareable from any computer or digital device around the world.

I hope you will all find inspiration as I continue to be inspired every day by our partners and friends who are committed to changing the lives of women and girls in the Mara Region.

Asante Sana!

Social Enterprise and Community Development: Baraki Sister Farm

4

As our crowdfunding campaign continues to build momentum, we wanted to be sure to highlight a community partner who is particularly dear to us.

You could say that our engagement with Tanzania, and more specifically the Mara Region, began with this amazing woman, Sister Janepha Mabonyesho. Although she now serves as Development Director of Baraki Sisters Farm, she was a student at D’Youville College in Buffalo, NY when I first met her back in 2007. The story of how I, Mara, first connected with this nun from the Mara Region of Tanzania is a remarkable one, and is detailed in Stories from the Tanzania Education Project, a personal narrative that I co-authored with Dan Nyaronga, Empire State College professor and my co-instructor, who happens to also be from this very same region (talk about coincidences…).

Fast forward our friendship 10+ years and imagine our joy in visiting Sister Janepha at her farm in Baraki, a comprehensive agricultural project that both fascinates and inspires our students to explore issues of social entrepreneurship and business.

us

At the center of Baraki is a fully functioning dairy farm that produces milk under the Baraki Sisters brand, while also providing pasteurization and a market for local women, along with raising livestock and agricultural crops to serve the community.

show

Baraki also provides education through its pre-primary and primary schools in addition to healthcare through its full-service clinic. These social services when coupled with the dairy business represent a progressively comprehensive approach to community development.

When students learn about Baraki’s long history, started in the 1970’s as an innovative community development initiative, they gain a new perspective on innovation that challenges their assumptions and cultural biases. But as Sister Janepha shares with our students, there are many challenges to the fiscal sustainability of the project and many opportunities for students and partners to add value through ideas and engagement.

Sister Janepha looks forward to hosting our students and involving them in the work of Baraki. She and her fellow Sisters graciously welcome other potential partners to experience the many facets of Baraki and explore exciting opportunities for collaboration.

 

Women’s Empowerment: Stephen Marwa and Hope Revival Children’s Organization

steph

It’s hard to imagine a more committed partner than Stephen Marwa, Executive Director of Hope Revival Children’s Organization.  A dedicated advocate for women’s empowerment and community development, Stephen is a stand-out when it comes to technology, communication and international engagement. His past projects have focused on social entrepreneurship (including the poultry project pictured below), agriculture, and education all in an effort to improve the lives and opportunities of women and girls in this underdeveloped region of northern Tanzania.

chicks

In an effort to further strengthen our collaboration, we gave Stephen a new computer tablet courtesy of Bak USA during our last study abroad trip in July 2018. Through his effortless mastery of this new technology, he has shared countless videos, social media posts and communications detailing his progress and seeking opportunities to do more for his community, and for our students. When Danielle became interested in the relationship between girls’ menstruation and educational achievement, Stephen immediately committed his full support and volunteered to travel to Arusha for a full week of training hosted by Dare Women’s Foundation, a non-profit engaged in a reusable pad sewing project. Since the visit, he has mobilized women and community leaders in Musoma, convening trainings and conducting preliminary research in collaboration with our partners at Buhare Community Development Training Institute (CDTI), readying the community for the new initiative.

Stephen is also a champion for clean water, working with Friendly Water for the World out of Olympia Washington to bring water filtration to the Musoma community. He looks forward to working with Matthew on sanitation and filtration efforts while also supporting Danielle and Lyndsey’s interest in women’s health and empowerment.

uuuuu

Learn more about Stephen’s efforts by friending him on Facebook (Stephen Marwa) or emailing him at stephen_chacha@yahoo.com

This post is part of a crowdfunding campaign to send UB students back to Tanzania to engage in community projects mentored by our partners, including Stephen. Visit  https://crowdfunding.buffalo.edu/project/8959  to support the initiative and please consider sharing with your networks.  Thank You!- Mara