Pole Pole (new reflections on ongoing Tanzania collaboration)

A brick making press changed everything. It was the perfect solution to a problem still ill-defined. Bricks create value. You can sell them, use them, transform them into functional things and structures. And the press allows you to make bricks, using local soil and labor. Only a little cement must be added, a material that is readily available. Think of the potential. Latrines, water collection systems and wells, safe houses, the community can literally build its own capacity. One brick-making press, and then perhaps another. Who would have thought it could be so simple.

Of course nothing is simple in Mara, or any other region facing so many challenges. I remember the first time I visited Stephen at Hope Revival, his NGO in Musoma. He was showing us his greenhouse and vegetables, planted in neat rows. He showed us his chicks that would be given to women to sell for  their eggs. I tried to see it all through his eyes, it was clear he was proud. But at the time it seemed so futile. Drip irrigation, he had said of the rusty hose with holes poked through it, not gushing water but barely dripping against dusty earth. And the chicks had almost perished. He had called me frantically via Messenger- there was no money for food or vaccinations. I had pulled together a make-shift fundraiser, inviting my daughter’s friends to “save the chicks”, bringing small donations in exchange for decorating cookies (eggs and chicks no less) and a used book swap. The chicks had survived, and here we were celebrating Stephen’s accomplishments.

Since that trip, there has been much to celebrate. So much, in fact, that I am losing my clarity. Trips are blending together, students and their projects. And while Stephen is still proud, his efforts have become much more ambitious. I couldn’t stifle a giggle when he recently shared plans to start a Center for Experiential Learning, housed at HRCO. It would show case the various projects involving our students and collaboration. Demonstration projects including the eco-flush latrine being designed by engineering students, along with solar electrification, reusable sanitary pads, batik, bicycles, and even a WiFi café that a student is working on. People could come and see, and engage, bringing back ideas and designs to their own villages throughout Mara and beyond. I giggled not because the vision seemed comical or even overly ambitious. On the contrary- it seemed so natural, the obvious next step in an extraordinary series of projects and stories. Stephen is leveraging his relationship with me, with the students and our university . He understands the power of the model. He is on his way.

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