From Mara to Mara (2)

My days are filled with poignant moments. Family meals, neighborhood walks, daily rituals cast in heightened relief, with contrasts and nuances amplified in detail and significance. My conversations with Stephen are no different. Yesterday morning he called while I was shopping, and I let the phone ring as he tried again and again to reach me, so sure that I would eventually pick up. I had been among the first in line at the grocery store, determined to stock my pantry with ample food and resources for the coming weeks. I had donned gloves and a mask hand-sewn by my daughter Natalie from Tanzanian fabrics brought back from my numerous trips. I had given her a stack of beautiful batik cloth of vibrant colors and patterns, in hopes of lightening this somber project.  

I eventually connected with Stephen and we began with news of the Virus. He had completed the initial field research in an island community in Rorya, a nearby district. He mentioned that in visiting a health clinic, they were entirely unaware of Corona and had virtually no hand washing or preventative measures in place. He planned to return with his soap making project, beginning to train local community members to produce this precious resource.

Our conversation quickly turned to the success of his research. The community had embraced his work with great enthusiasm and gratitude and the leaders were eager to connect and discuss possibilities for future collaboration. The initial work was complete, and I felt a tremendous sense of relief that we had found a way to make it happen. With the spread of the Virus and the move to online instruction, virtually every project has come to a halt, a state of suspended animation as we await the dreaded apex and begin the envision the other side. How fortunate that the fundraiser was successful and I was able to send over $450 to support the initial work. Although I had targeted the mapping project as the focus of the Happy Hour and GoFundMe campaign, it was all related and my friends and colleagues were happy to offer their support. Thankfully, Stephen understood the preciousness of the gift, and was determined to use the funds strategically in recognition of their significance.

It is this recognition that lingers in my mind as I type these reflections. Stephen understands the preciousness of our gifts. He also understands the spirit of collaboration that drives my continued efforts. He said that while grants and sponsors offer valuable resources, they bring frustration and complexity. Instead, it is better to build from within, laying the foundation through an understanding of needs and strengths, and building growth through trust and relationships, moving forward and expanding through collaboration and synergies. Although Stephen did not use these words, he did convey their essence, an exquisite recognition of a truth that has given me strength, and continues to drive all that I do and know.

Stephen ended the conversation with his hopes that HRCO will become an organization known globally for its work and partnerships, a model for what is possible for communities and people around the world.    

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